Driver Rehabilitation Instructors, Medical Professionals, and Certified Specialists

The Groups, Associations and Professionals 

CDRS® Certified Driver Rehabilitation Specialist is a credential offered by ADED (The Association for Driver Rehabilitation Specialists) representing advanced experience and expertise in diverse areas within the field. A CDRS® is an experienced practitioner in the field of driver rehabilitation who, through successful completion of a formal certification examination, has proven their capacity to provide services within the full spectrum of driver rehabilitation services. Currently, there are about 370 active CDRS® in the U.S. and Canada.

CDRS and DRS Search available on the ADED.net website

DRS (Driver Rehabilitation Specialist) is a professional who plans, develops, coordinates, and implements driving services for individuals with disabilities.  These professionals are typically allied health personnel, driving instructors and others who have specialized in this area and received continuing education in the field, but who have not obtained the certification offered by ADED.  There are nearly 750 individuals who have identified themselves as DRS in the U.S. and Canada.

ADED (The Association for Driver Rehabilitation Specialists) was established in 1977 to support professionals working in the field of driver education / driver training and transportation equipment modifications for persons with disabilities through education and information dissemination. ADED, a nonprofit association, is the primary professional organization in this specialized area, and stands ready to meet the professional needs of its members through educational conferences and research support as well as encouraging equipment development to maximize the transportation options for persons with disabilities.

AOTA (The American Occupational Therapist Association) In its simplest terms, occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants help people across the lifespan participate in the things they want and need to do through the therapeutic use of everyday activities (occupations). Common occupational therapy interventions include helping children with disabilities to participate fully in school and social situations, helping people recovering from injury to regain skills, and providing supports for older adults experiencing physical and cognitive changes.

Driving Rehabilitation Specialist Search available on the AOTA.org website